Original writings by Avi Sion on the theory and practice of inductive and deductive LOGIC  

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FUTURE LOGIC

Avi Sion, 1990 (Rev. ed. 1996) All rights reserved.

 

PART IV.   DE-RE CONDITIONING.

 

33.            CONDITIONAL PROPOSITIONS.

1.    De-re Conditioning. 

2.    Types of Causality. 

3.    Laws of Causality. 

 

34.            NATURAL CONDITIONALS: FEATURES.

1.    Basis and Connection.

2.    Quantification. 

3.    Other Features. 

4.    Natural Disjunction.

 

35.            NATURAL CONDITIONALS: OPPOSITIONS, EDUCTIONS.

1.    Translations.

2.    Oppositions. 

3.    Eductions. 

 

36.            NATURAL CONDITIONAL SYLLOGISM AND PRODUCTION.

1.    Syllogism.

2.    Summary and Quantities.

3.    Production. 

 

37.            NATURAL APODOSIS AND DILEMMA.

1.    Apodosis.

2.    Dilemma. 

 

38.            TEMPORAL CONDITIONALS.

1.    Structure and Properties.

2.    Relationships to Naturals. 

3.    Mixed Modality Arguments.

 

39.            EXTENSIONALS: FEATURES, OPPOSITIONS, EDUCTIONS.

1.    Main Features. 

2.    Modal and Other Forms.

3.    Oppositions. 

4.    Translations and Eductions. 

 

40.            EXTENSIONAL CONDITIONAL DEDUCTION.

1.    Syllogism. 

2.    Production. 

3.    Apodoses. 

4.    Dilemma.

 

41.            MODALITIES OF SUBSUMPTION.

1.    Formal Review.

2.    Impact. 

3.    Primitives. 

4.    Transformations.

5.    Imaginary Terms. 

 

42.            CONDENSED PROPOSITIONS.

1.    Forms with Complex Terms. 

2.    Making Possible or Necessary. 

 

 

Summary of findings in the chapters of this part:

Part IV. The Logic of De-re Conditioning . This field may be viewed as an expansion of the modal categorical logic presented in part II (by considering propositions with more than two terms), or as a broadening of the logic of conditioning presented in part III (by considering non-logical types of modality); in either case, it seems to be entirely original. The value of this field to all future science and ontology is inestimable it sets new, very high standards of precision for any discussion of causal relations.

33. Just as logical modality gives rise to logical conditioning, so the natural, temporal and extensional modalities give rise to their own quite distinct types of ( de-re ) conditioning and thence in turn to various types of causal relation.

34. We began our analysis with reference to natural conditioning, proceeding much as we had done for logical conditioning. The features of natural conditionals were distinguished, including their bases and connections and their quantities. We also noted the issues of sequence of the theses, modalities of actualization, and acquisition and loss of powers. Natural disjunction was also mentioned.

35. We looked into the relations between natural conditionals and categoricals; and we investigated the oppositions among, and eductions from, these new forms.

36. We developed the main valid moods of natural conditional syllogism, and also listed the subaltern and invalid moods. We described the productive arguments, which enable us to infer, and thus form, natural conditionals from modal categorical premises.

37. Natural apodosis, both actual and modal, was analyzed; and so was natural dilemma.

38. We similarly investigated the structure and properties of temporal conditionals, showing their exact relation to naturals (especially noteworthy, was their discontinuity), and various arguments of mixed modal-type were presented.

39. Then we considered extensional conditionals their (analogous yet distinct) features, oppositions, and eductions.

40. And we analyzed, for extensional conditionals, syllogism, production, apodosis and dilemma in some detail.

41. Development of the logics of various types of conditionals allowed us to review certain issues concerning categorical propositions, with more powerful formal tools. Until then, the modalities of subsumption by the terms of categoricals had been skimmed over; now, a more nuanced approach became possible. Included here was discussion of imaginary terms.

42. We were also now able to analyze certain condensed forms, which are thought of as categorical but involve some kind of conditioning, including forms with complex terms, and those having to do with aetiology, teleology and ethical modality.

   

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